Thursday, February 28, 2013

Shakespeare in Where on Earth is Carmen Sandiego?—Part Two

“Cupid Sandiego.” By Diane M. Fresco. Perf. Rita Moreno, Rodger Bumpass, Jennifer Hale, and Scott Menville Dir. Stan Phillips. Where on Earth is Carmen Sandiego? Season 4, episode 7. FOX. 12 December 1996 (?). DVD. Mill Creek Entertainment, 2012.

Toward the end of its run, the Saturday morning cartoon show Where on Earth is Carmen Sandiego returned to a Shakespearean theme with this episode. In it, the detectives learn that Carmen is about to steal a balcony—but they have to deduce which of three famous balconies she's after.

Guess which one it turns out to be!

video

Links: The Episode at IMDB.


Click below to purchase the film from amazon.com
(and to support Bardfilm as you do so).

    

Wednesday, February 27, 2013

Shakespeare in Where on Earth is Carmen Sandiego?—Part One

“The Play's the Thing.” By Richard Merwin and Sean Roche. Perf. Rita Moreno, Rodger Bumpass, Jennifer Hale, and Scott Menville. Dir. Joe Barruso. Where on Earth is Carmen Sandiego? Season 1, episode 10. FOX. 7 May 1994. DVD. Mill Creek Entertainment, 2012.

I've adored FoxTrot since my earliest days; since then, I've also followed Carmen Sandiego in all her various incarnations—the Brøderbund software, the PBS game show, and the Saturday morning cartoon show.

It's the last of those that's relevant to this post. The show was intentionally structured as an educational adventure; on at least two occasions, the content turned to Shakespeare.

On the first occasion, Carmen leaves a clue with a quote from the opening of Antony and Cleopatra: "Goodly eyes" (I.i.2). The full line, delivered by Philo, is critical of Antony for turning his goodly eyes from their natural, Roman, warlike state to eyes of love for Cleopatra:
Nay, but this dotage of our general's
O'erflows the measure: those his goodly eyes,
That o'er the files and musters of the war
Have glow'd like plated Mars, now bend, now turn,
The office and devotion of their view
Upon a tawny front: his captain's heart,
Which in the scuffles of great fights hath burst
The buckles on his breast, reneges all temper,
And is become the bellows and the fan
To cool a gipsy's lust. (I.i.1-10)
The show gives us a bit of that line—while giving us a brief glance at the works of William Shakespeare!  Enjoy!

video

Links: The Episode at IMDB.


Click below to purchase the complete series from amazon.com
(and to support Bardfilm as you do so).

    

Tuesday, February 26, 2013

Yet Another Shakespearean FoxTrot

Amend, Bill. "Peter's Paper." Jasotron: 2012: A FoxTrot collection. Andrews McMeel: Kansas City, 2012. 83.

Bill Amend's semi-retirement has been hard on all of us.

His weekly comic strips were delightful, providing us with joyful and profound insight into characters that we grew to love.

Fortunately, he continues to create Sunday comics, for which we all thank him. Two books of the Sunday strips have already been released. The Sunday comics don't have the same build-up and continuity that the weekly strips had, but they continue to give us windows into the life of the Fox family.

And just occasionally, they have a Shakespeare connection. When they do, I'm all over them like ink on a cartoonist's fingers. Here's the latest one I noticed (click to enlarge the image):


Links: The Official Site of FoxTrot.


Click below to purchase the book from amazon.com
(and to support Bardfilm as you do so).

    
Bardfilm is normally written as one word, though it can also be found under a search for "Bard Film Blog." Bardfilm is a Shakespeare blog (admittedly, one of many Shakespeare blogs), and it is dedicated to commentary on films (Shakespeare movies, The Shakespeare Movie, Shakespeare on television, Shakespeare at the cinema), plays, and other matter related to Shakespeare (allusions to Shakespeare in pop culture, quotes from Shakespeare in popular culture, quotations that come from Shakespeare, et cetera).

Unless otherwise indicated, quotations from Shakespeare's works are from the following edition:
Shakespeare, William. The Riverside Shakespeare. 2nd ed. Gen. ed. G. Blakemore Evans. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1997.
All material original to this blog is copyrighted: Copyright 2008-2016 (and into perpetuity thereafter) by Keith Jones.

The very instant that I saw you did / My heart fly to your service; there resides, / To make me slave to it; and, for your sake, / Am I this patient [b]log-man.

—The Tempest